Photo 1 Sep 71 notes deathandmysticism:

St. Luke represented by his symbol of a winged ox in Ars Memorandi, ca. 1470

deathandmysticism:

St. Luke represented by his symbol of a winged ox in Ars Memorandi, ca. 1470

Photo 1 Sep 831 notes sonofthedesert:

Gateshead riverside, c.1879
(from Newcastle libraries)

sonofthedesert:

Gateshead riverside, c.1879

(from Newcastle libraries)

(Source: newcastle.gov.uk)

Photo 31 Aug 63 notes The Discovery of a Book, November 1978

The following is a transcript of a talk given at the Bartholdy Institute in London on the 12th of November, 1978, by Professor Linda Franklin. It details the discovery and subsequent interpretation of a 17th Century book, ostensibly entitled the Bremen MS.209, though known more commonly as the Liber Parvorum Spirituum. At the time of writing, little over a third of the original text had been transcribed, the remaining chapters were undergoing restoration works following water damage some time in the years prior to the book’s discovery. Translation efforts were also impeded by the unorthodox approach to grammar in many of the Latin sections of the text. Since the talk was delivered, a consensus has now been reached among the text’s translators, with the exception of a few of the more oblique passages. The damaged sections of the text are still undergoing restoration, though new photographic technology is uncovering new details hitherto lost, and a complete edition is lined up for publication in the Autumn of 2015.

Click here to read on…

The Discovery of a Book, November 1978

The following is a transcript of a talk given at the Bartholdy Institute in London on the 12th of November, 1978, by Professor Linda Franklin. It details the discovery and subsequent interpretation of a 17th Century book, ostensibly entitled the Bremen MS.209, though known more commonly as the Liber Parvorum Spirituum. At the time of writing, little over a third of the original text had been transcribed, the remaining chapters were undergoing restoration works following water damage some time in the years prior to the book’s discovery. Translation efforts were also impeded by the unorthodox approach to grammar in many of the Latin sections of the text. Since the talk was delivered, a consensus has now been reached among the text’s translators, with the exception of a few of the more oblique passages. The damaged sections of the text are still undergoing restoration, though new photographic technology is uncovering new details hitherto lost, and a complete edition is lined up for publication in the Autumn of 2015.
Video 31 Aug 17 notes

By night, I am Rave Priestess.

Photo 31 Aug 284 notes magictransistor:

IF Science Fiction N° 114, The Robots Are Here, 1967.

magictransistor:

IF Science Fiction N° 114, The Robots Are Here, 1967.

Video 31 Aug 401 notes

magictransistor:

Saint Bede the Venerable, Saint Isidore of Sevilla, Saint Abbo of Fleury. Cosmography, Walters MS W73. 1100s.

Created in 12th century England, this manuscript was intended to be a scientific textbook for monks, designed as a compendium of cosmographical knowledge. The complex diagrams that accompany the texts help to illustrate this knowledge, and include visualizations of the heavens and earth, seasons, winds, tides, and the zodiac, as well as demonstrations of how these things relate to man. Most of the diagrams are rotae, or wheel-shaped schemata, favored throughout the Middle Ages for the presentation of scientific and cosmological ideas. Moreover, the circle, considered the most perfect shape and a symbol of God, was seen as conveying the cyclical nature of time and the Creation as well as the logic, order, and harmony of the created universe.

Photo 30 Aug 169 notes antitacta:

Nathan Bishop, Wild Hunt, 2009.

antitacta:

Nathan Bishop, Wild Hunt, 2009.

(Source: nbishop.net)

Photo 30 Aug 559 notes architectureofdoom:

"The ‘320° Licht’ installation of urbanscreen uses the cathedral-like beauty of the Oberhausen’s Gasometer in Germany as the starting point for a fascinating game with shapes and light. Within a radius of 320 degrees graphic patterns grow and change on the 100-metre high inside wall of the Gasometer."

architectureofdoom:

"The ‘320° Licht’ installation of urbanscreen uses the cathedral-like beauty of the Oberhausen’s Gasometer in Germany as the starting point for a fascinating game with shapes and light. Within a radius of 320 degrees graphic patterns grow and change on the 100-metre high inside wall of the Gasometer."

(Source: andgatherer)

via Min.
Photo 30 Aug 26,647 notes curiosamathematica:

Cabbage exhibits a beautiful geometric pattern.

Ah, the Cabbonacci sequence.

curiosamathematica:

Cabbage exhibits a beautiful geometric pattern.

Ah, the Cabbonacci sequence.

Photo 30 Aug 20 notes
via Cytera.

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